TerraTech are no longer supporting 32-Bit

Gayvid`

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Sep 12, 2015
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It's 16 exabytes, theoretically speaking. 32 bit only has 2^32 bytes which is equal to 4 gigabytes, but 64 bit has 2^64 bytes which is equal to 16 exabytes which also is equal to 16.8 million terabytes.
With that much ram , your cpu would be slower then a snail.
 

harpo99999

Ah kick till it starts
Aug 14, 2014
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imagine making that a ram drive, lol
unfortunately the hardware ie cpu & motherboard chipset also have a HUGE factor in the ram limits for computers (along with the ram stick capacity) some motherboards only have two ram slots some four, and some very rare one even have 8 slots and as ram sticks range from 32mb to 16gb each(ignoring the TYPE of ram in the stick for a simple summary), so assuming it is a ddr4 ram system and the cpu and motherboard are also for ddr4 then the ram installed in a computer could be from 4gb to 128 gb (and from what I remember reading the actual addressable space is somewhere in the area of 2^48 or 2^56 (this is a design decision by the cpu/chipset makers to simplify the designing of the cpus/chipsets)
 

Gayvid`

Yes, I'm a well-known member
Sep 12, 2015
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unfortunately the hardware ie cpu & motherboard chipset also have a HUGE factor in the ram limits for computers (along with the ram stick capacity) some motherboards only have two ram slots some four, and some very rare one even have 8 slots and as ram sticks range from 32mb to 16gb each(ignoring the TYPE of ram in the stick for a simple summary), so assuming it is a ddr4 ram system and the cpu and motherboard are also for ddr4 then the ram installed in a computer could be from 4gb to 128 gb (and from what I remember reading the actual addressable space is somewhere in the area of 2^48 or 2^56 (this is a design decision by the cpu/chipset makers to simplify the designing of the cpus/chipsets)
I meant aside from the limits
 

Dellamorte

Well-Known Member
Feb 10, 2015
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The main thing when you start getting such large amounts of RAM is the bus channels dedicated to RAM. For the most part, if you have 4 slots and only one channel for RAM it will be accessed much slower than if you have 4 slots and 4 channels for RAM. There are also other factors such as mobo bus speed like a single channel system could still be faster if the bus speed is high enough to compensate.

I have been building systems for over 20 years so I know a few things about computer hardware, I have worked on many servers in my day starting from basic home systems to systems to go into banks and other large corporate environments. Domestic computing is rather basic compared to the considerations needed for large-scale computing. It took me years to learn the ins and outs of mobos designs to know what I am looking at and what product is the best-priced solution for someone's needs.

No, I do not work in the field but I have had a number of friends who have owned computer shops over the years and they would often pass on strange systems that they could not get running. I can confidently claim a 99% success rate so I guess I have picked up a few things over the years.

In fact, I am planning on building a new home server next year this is one of the systems I am looking at but I am ideally looking for a board with 50Gb Ethernet rather than 40 but this will do in a pinch.

  • 2 x Cavium® ThunderX™ 48-core ARM processors
  • 16 x DDR4 DIMM slots
  • 3 x 40GbE QSFP+ LAN ports
  • 4 x 10GbE SFP+ LAN ports
  • 12 x 3.5” or 2.5" hot-swappable HDD/SSD bays
  • 750W 80 PLUS Gold redundant PSU
I think 96 cores should be enough for a few VMs ;).
 
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Gayvid`

Yes, I'm a well-known member
Sep 12, 2015
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The main thing when you start getting such large amounts of RAM is the bus channels dedicated to RAM. For the most part, if you have 4 slots and only one channel for RAM it will be accessed much slower than if you have 4 slots and 4 channels for RAM. There are also other factors such as mobo bus speed like a single channel system could still be faster if the bus speed is high enough to compensate.

I have been building systems for over 20 years so I know a few things about computer hardware, I have worked on many servers in my day starting from basic home systems to systems to go into banks and other large corporate environments. Domestic computing is rather basic compared to the considerations needed for large-scale computing. It took me years to learn the ins and outs of mobos designs to know what I am looking at and what product is the best-priced solution for someone's needs.

No, I do not work in the field but I have had a number of friends who have owned computer shops over the years and they would often pass on strange systems that they could not get running. I can confidently claim a 99% success rate so I guess I have picked up a few things over the years.

In fact, I am planning on building a new home server next year this is one of the systems I am looking at but I am ideally looking for a board with 50Gb Ethernet rather than 40 but this will do in a pinch.

  • 2 x Cavium® ThunderX™ 48-core ARM processors
  • 16 x DDR4 DIMM slots
  • 3 x 40GbE QSFP+ LAN ports
  • 4 x 10GbE SFP+ LAN ports
  • 12 x 3.5” or 2.5" hot-swappable HDD/SSD bays
  • 750W 80 PLUS Gold redundant PSU
I think 96 cores should be enough for a few VMs ;).
Wtf do you need 50gb ethernet for , i don't even think linus tech tips needs that much internet speed. The rest is a normal type of really high end stuff.
 

Dellamorte

Well-Known Member
Feb 10, 2015
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Need right now is not the question, I plan to keep the system for 6 years or so. Also I plan to use it for video streaming, editing and storage, 4K uncompressed video takes a lot of data.
 

Telemak

Well-Known Member
Oct 5, 2016
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Yay it was the Commodore 64, but 64 refers to the 64 kb of RAM huhu
 

Telemak

Well-Known Member
Oct 5, 2016
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2^8 = 64. Sorry for this mistake. We owe so much USA for computer science.